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[applause]>> montana governor steve bullock gave his first state of the state address speech focusing on the budget, job creation, and making government efficient and accountable to taxpayers. this is about 45 minutes. [applause] >> lieutenant governor walsh, mr. president, mr. speaker, members of the 63rd legislature, and honored members of the judiciary, my fellow statewide officials, tribal leaders, members of the cabinet, and my fellow montanans, lisa, our three children, caroline, alex and cameron. my name is steve and i work for the state. [laughter][applause] i, like my 12,000 coworkers, arrive at the jobsite each day to serve the people of montana. it is an honor and pleasure to be the public servant entrusted with delivering this address. any change of administration naturally brings change to the governor's mansion -- changes in substance, style, and perspective. with the bullocks moving into the neighborhood, some of that change is unavoidable. it's been 40 years since the predominant noise emanating from the governor's mansion has been the sound of young children
that went through that should not say we did not learn anything. steve me that this paper does not show the history of 1986. i hope they can do it. it is my responsibility to make sure they do. >> are you using that same word amnesty to refer to the proposal put out by these eight senators at? >> listen. when you legalize anybody that did anything illegally, i guess i would say he had given a person amnesty. we do not use the word amnesty just for immigration. we do it for tax policy. people that do not pay their taxes. >> looked down the road six or eight months. what will be the big sticking point and immigration? give me the first paragraph of the story about why the two sides appear step? >> that leads to immigration. that way to citizenship. >> the simple concept of methodology? >> the methodology and determination of when the border is it here. >> what about the methodology? will it be a fight over a trigger? >> that is the basis for it. i think i have spoken to its. committees are going to make a determination that the border is secure and in the pathway to citizenship kicks in.
of the congressional delegation from nevada, steve and gina. [applause] your own mayor, carolyn goodman. [applause] we also have some mayors who flew in because they know how important issue we are to talk about today is. maria from arizona. qassim from atlanta, georgia. rick from phoenix, arizona. and ashley from fresno, calif. [applause] than all of you are here, as well as some of the top labor leaders in the country. we are so grateful. outstanding business leaders are here as well. of course, we have wonderful students here. [applause] those of you have a seat, feel free to take a seat. i do not mind. i love you back. [applause] last week, i had the honor of being sworn in for a second term as president of the united states. [applause] and during my inaugural address, i talked about how making progress on the finding challenges of our time does not require us to settle every debate or ignore every different we may have, but it does require us to find common ground and move forward in common purpose. it requires us to act. i know that some issues will be harder to lift than others. some debates wi
dedicated service on behalf of the american people. as a nobel prize-winning physicist or scientist, steve brought to the energy department a unique understanding of both the urgent challenge presented by climate change and the tremendous opportunity that clean energy represents for our country. this again is the president speaking. during his time as secretary, steve helped my administration move america toward real energy independence. over the past four years we have doubled the use of renewable energy, dramatically reduced our dependence on foreign oil and put our country on a path to win the global race for clean energy jobs. you can readed the full statement at your leisure. without that i'll go to questions. >> thanks. does the president consider the attack on our embassy in turkey to be a terrorist attack and does have he information about who may have perpetrated it? >> that's an excellent question. the act -- a suicide bombing on the perimeter of an embassy is by definition an act of terror. it is a terrorist attack. however, we do not know at this point who is responsible or th
: thank you for the call. steve is joining us from minnesota. caller: good morning. you know -- am i on? host: you sure are. caller: the building behind you. when these people get into it, they really screwed up. i do not know. host: ok. we will leave it there. our question, should there be more regulations on this super bowl sunday? a story from politico. if you are watching the game tonight, you will see a 32nd spot. the headline -- " super --2013: bloomberg-founded mayors' group sponsors gun control ad." the ad calls for lawmakers to pass rules requiring background checks. it is narrated by children with "america, the beautiful"playing in the background. where are you calling from? you are on the air. caller: i would like to comment that if the president and government is so worried about injuries a dental health, maybe they should consider the abortion issue and the disproportionate killing of african american babies. host: ok. from "the new republic." he was asked about football injuries at the high school level and the nfl and he said "i am a big football fan, but if i had a son,
a national infrastructure project. we could put people to work. host: steve from twitter -- host: next we're going to charlie. mississippi, independent line. caller: good morning. i am from jackson, where the capital is. i retired in 2009. it is a good thing. i was a civil servant. now in the state house there is legislation where some young republicans want to phase out our state retirement program for civil servants. house bill 486 allows people to just elect, if they want to contribute to like a personal retirement system instead of state retirement. host: as far as your personal plan, is that grandfathered by these proposals from the legislature? caller: most of the bill has been in committee. they grandfathered me in because they have retired -- because i have retired. the same thing will for the retirement system, it will bleed people also. host: you do not have to mention specifics, but do you receive a monthly benefit, then? >> it is -- caller: it is about $1,300. i have saved up about $30,000. i am set up, in a way. host: are you going to take social security? have you? caller: i
. speaker, at this time i'd like to yield to my colleague and my good friend from new mexico, mr. steve pierce. mr. pearce: i thank the gentleman for yielding and for his -- mr. steve pears. mr. pearce: i thank -- mr. steve pearce. mr. pearce: i thank my good friend for yielding to me. this idea is indeed a bipartisan issue. you know, our founding fathers came here from countries that had monarchs, kings. kings that could tell a person who they were to marry, what job they could have, what level of education that they might attain. they could tell you what church you must be a member of. it was those state-ordained religions that many came to this country to get away from. they came here with an idea of a government that could only declare what your freedoms were, not limit those freedoms. it was that freedom of religion that caused many of the colonies to be organized differently, by different faiths. and some by no faith at all. it was in that backdrop that the constitution was written which caused our founding fathers great pause. the initial constitution was written and could not be
at the debate. nothing. >> thank you. >> yes please. >> my name is steve. i work in the news business. to the extent that you are all familiar, share some anecdotes about stage manager on some of these debates and keeping people on time and their cues and not bearing far-off from the questions. >> time cues and stuff, i'll tell you a quick antidote. 1988. george h. w. bush. halfway into the debate, george h. w. bush was giving an answer. time cues were liked. high-tech. greenlight, red light, yellow light. greenlight means top, red light means shut up. george w. bush is in the middle of an answer and i stopped him. i said the time was up. he pointed to the lights that were under the tv cameras. in my ear i heard the voice of the executive producer saying, jim, he is right. [laughter] in front of everyone i have ever known in my whole life, i said, mr. vice president. you're right. go ahead. i forgot what i was going to say. go ahead. never wanted to be seen again. i still do not know what happened. >> yes please. >> hi. bob wiener. i'm a mainstreet reporter radio. question -- would gi
, please? >> my name is steve. i work in the news business. to the extent you are familiar, so some anecdotes about planned stage management about some of these debates and keeping people on time with their cues and not veering too far off the questions. thanks. >> keeping on cue. i will tell you a quick anecdote. my first debate in 1988, george h. w. bush vs. michael dukakis. george h. w. bush was the vice president and he gave an answer. high-tech, green light, yellow light, red light, and green light said you could talk, yellow lights that you could line up, red light said shut up. george h. w. bush in the middle of an answer, i stopped him and said, mr. vice president, your time is up. he pointed to the lights and said, i have still got some time. in my ear, i heard the voice of the executive producer saying, jim, he is right. [laughter] in front of everybody i have ever known in my whole life -- [laughter] i said, i am sorry, you are right, go ahead. he looked at me and said, i forgot what i was going to say. [laughter] i wanted the biggest hole in the world to drop in and neve
should be put away. thank you. >> steve is an independent caller in michigan. >> i want to repeat what the last gentleman said. i'm a junkie on these things. this hearing demonstrated the highest kinds of ways our government should work. the questions were on point, there's was little grandstanding. there was no politicking that i could see. people did have their points compared to the haguele hearings last week. this was the highest and i'm afraid the ones for hagel had to do with the quality of the candidates, particularly, mr. brennan. >> given the fact that was sensitive information. do you feel like you learned a lot from the hearing? caller: yes, i guess i learned more about brennan than i knew. he appears to be, at least by reputation in the way they talked about him that he's not going to be so secretive as some of the past c.i.a. directors have been. i'm sure there are things he committed to that he went be able to do. >> he spent time in the c.i.a. and he was former executive deputy director from 2001-2003. bill is on the republican line. bill, hello. caller: how are you? >>
. >> steve. i worked in the news business and study here in the city. thank you, senator. do john mccain and barack obama finally see eye to eye on a piece of legislation? second question -- >> can i answer the first one? >> you and the president finally see eye to eye? >> we see the goal, but we have not seen the specifics of the president's proposal yet. i think he is holding off until he sees what kind of product to get out of the senate and/or the house. i think we see eye to eye on the goal. i am not sure whether we see eye to eye on some of the particulars. >> you, your father, and your son have served in the military. can you comment on the secretary of defense remarks yesterday about the pay cuts? -- pay cuts for troops, regarding sequestration? >> sablan republicans. i blame democrats for ever coming to such a conclusion. i am a great admirer of secretary panetta. the great national security background. as you may remember, he was chairman of the budget committee in the house. he has a better handle on those issues than any other person. he is beside himself. he says shame on th
together and got it done. i want to congratulate the owners -- the owner, steve bisciotti, a class act, who does work on and off the field. the general manager, ozzie newsome and of course the players, number 52, ray lewis, and number five, joe flacco, who won m.v.p. of the game. at the end of the day it was lights out for the 49ers. baltimore cannot be more proud to welcome our players and the vince lombardi trophy back home. i want to say our leader, nancy pelosi, who is homegrown baltimore, she is now a 49ers fan, but she did accept a defeat with her regular class and dignity. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. for what purpose does the gentlelady from california seek recognition? >> to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady is recognized. ms. pelosi: i rise to congratulate -- i was going to call him -- congressman rupp ersberger and other members of the maryland delegation, more importantly, join them in congratulating the ravens on a -- they beat a mighty champion at the super bowl. as a proud 49e
of the disadvantaged. host: laudan aron? because really what steve said is the main point. the panel just did not have a lot of data to really begin to cross-national differences on that, but it is clearly a very intuitive and logical line of research that we would love to continue to support with additional data. i did also want to point out that so many of these comments about our lifestyles and exercise and pe with children are really about prevention. not getting ill to begin with. it does seem that especially since we documented this, the pervasiveness of the help disadvantaged across the life course, trying to prevent illness early in life and keeping americans healthy is really the way to go. if we could figure out how to do that on all fronts, i think we would be in much better shape. host: a viewer tweets in -- can you go through the good news? what did you find that gives hope? guest: there are definitely a few areas where we did not find a disadvantage, and we were at the top of the heap, so to speak. one of them, ages above 75 -- age-specific mortality rates at those higher ages are defini
is steve from new jersey on our line for independents. he has a son who caller: is adopted -- he has a son who was adopted. caller: we adopted our son 17 years ago from canada. he is almost 18 years old, and i'm finding that the paperwork -- i'm finding the paperwork, and he is not considered -- he is illegal actually. the judge and everything died, and now we are trying to go through a lawyer to try to find something that we can do before he becomes 18 years old to make sure that everything is ok. do you have any answers for me? guest: i hope you will contact our organization after this call. up until the year 2000, our laws or not structured assets that make it that when a child was adopted by a u.s. citizen, there were confirmed as the citizenship of their parents. congress realize that in 2000 and passed the child citizenship act, but as you said, children who were not aware of that or did not benefit from it are still in this position of being here illegally. congress is aware of situations like your son's and helping to address it legislatively speaking next year, but there are thing
, democratic caller. steve. caller: good morning. i am a democrat but i tend to stay independent with things. it seems like the republicans -- it might not be true, but there is always the appearance that you want to push the pain on a broader section and towards the bottom. to that, i had a couple of questions. what is your stance on competitive bidding for rd medicare? -- four part d medicare? also, the simple fix for social security of raising the cap might even if it is just to say 200,000 dollars, and i am sure your mom did not lay bricks, so raising the medicare age to 67 for someone that laid bricks their whole life might not be great. host: congressman? guest: the caller is correct, she did not lay bricks, budget a lot of jobs. she worked for the, a dental asn later years. but you are right. on that point, the idea -- i guess his point is when you talk about raising the age, can you do it? what sort of career, what sort of rights do you have? that is an interesting discussion to have. it gets more complicated because you could say i laid bricks 30 years ago but now for the last 20 ye
, but it is a concern of mine that we might be advertising. steve king had gone over to talk with folks and they do not like the term illegal immigration in england. they told that -- told us is a regular migration. whether it is a regular migration or illegal immigration, they said they had a law that provides if you come into england, you have to swear that you will not accept any government benefits for five years. as they said, since it is all about the best interests of our country, we need to make sure people coming in and contribute before they take out. would anyone have a problem if we had such a prohibition? we welcome you in, what ever comprehensive agreement gets worked out, to have an agreement, you do not get benefits until you are here five years contributing to the system. anyone have a problem with that? >> we have to provide medical benefits regardless of who we bring in. that is a must for every human being. >> whoever we bring in we will give free health care. >> the insurance. >> if someone comes in paying for it they're not getting free health care. >> it should be paid for. >
, democrat caller. steve. caller: good morning. i am a democrat but i tend to stay independent with things. it seems like the republicans -- it might not be true, but there is always the appearance that youant to push the pain on a broader section and towar the bottom. to that, i had a couple of questions. what is your stance on competitive bidding for rd medicare? -- four part d medicare? also, the simple fix for social security of raising the cap might even if it is just to say 200,000 dollars, and i am sure your mom did not lay bricks, so raising the medicare age to 67 for someone that laid bricks their whole life might not be great. host: congressman? guest: the caller is correct, she did not lay bricks, budget a lot of jobs. she worked for the, a dental asn later years. but you are right. on that point, the idea -- i guess his point is when you talk about raising the age, can you do it? what sort of career, what sort of rights do you have? that is an interesting discussion to have. it gets more complicated because you could say i laid bricks 30 years ago but now for the last 20 years
need. i read about steve foster from taunton in the local newspaper. he's suffering from thyroid cancer, his brother has cancer, hi wife and father both died of cancer. all four worked in the plant. yet, i i worked to larry darcy, diagnosed with kidney cancer in 199. he went out of his way to credit your company for the opportunities it gave him and his co-workers. over 180 of those co-workers from the attleboro plant that he's aware of contracted some type of cancer. i tell the story, sir, not to cast blame, the human cost of this country's nuclear development in the 1950's and 1960's is not unique to texas instruments or to attleboro. but i do believe that t.i., along with the federal government, has a responseability to the men and women that we put in harm's way. while we can't take back the exposure to the radioactive or toxic material so many suffered, what we can do is everything in our power to make sure we ease their pain today. so, sir, i'd like your opinion on how my office can work with your company and the department of labor, department of energy to ensure that we are doin
blunt than peter. i think there's a great little passage in water isaacson's biography of steve jobs and president obama's speech on undocumented immigration and what he's able to get on that front. remember that slice of the population that is foreign born, you know, a decent number of them are part of the electorate now and are engaged and this comes down to recognition and respect. there was bipartisan legislation done at the start of visa and things like that and i think you're right, a piecemeal approach would be sane but from the perspective of the lobbyists, it makes sense that well let's attack this all at once because if you have attached the attractive piece of legislation to less attractive piece of legislation -- considering with the affordable care act, if you saw just the coverage expanding provisions in one law, it wouldn't look improving. if only have the revenue provisions of the affordable care act, it looks like a massive tax increase. combine them into one single piece of legislation, it's attractive. i think it's the same dynamic and i think that's why we should
about which approached the preferred. steve? >> 43 republican senators signed a letter to the president today, saying they would block any nominee for the consumer financial protection bureau, unless you change the law, the same stance they had in the last congress. i wonder if you have any reaction. >> it is unfortunate that a minority of the u.s. senate continues to oppose the implementation of wall street reform designed to protect the american taxpayer from the kind of crisis we sought engendered by the collapse of our financial sector in 2007 and 2008. it was designed to protect the establishment -- it was established to make sure that the average americans who have dealings with financial institutions have somebody in washington looking out for their interest, because financial institutions, as you know, have plenty of people in washington looking out for theirs. it is unfortunate that republicans have continued their efforts to oppose this bureau, oppose the implementation of a key component of the wall street reform law. it is tough to explain to the american people, whose memor
, thank you for the great work that you guys are doing each afternoon day. to steve israel who worked tirelessly to bring on 49 new outstanding members of this caucus. [cheers and applause] i am looking forward to spending time with all 49 of you. hopefully we'll see you at the white house and at various events but i know you came here to get something done. i look forward to working with you every single day to do what is right by the people who sent us here. i changed the format here. originally the way this is scheduled, i was going to talk and shake some hands and i thought since this is not a shy bunch. it might make sense for me to take some questions and advice, i'm sure you guys have for me. what i'm going to do is make a few points a the top and what i would like is maybe somebody can come up here and you can call on folks and we'll spend a little time with q&a before i have a chance to say hello to everybody. i want to keep my remark short because i made a pretty long speech a couple weeks ago. i'm about to make another one next week and i don't want you guy tired of me. dee
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)